The Pinecrest Bed and Breakfast Asheville NC

Posts Tagged ‘asheville restaurants’

Asheville Restaurant Review: Seven Sows Bourbon & Larder

April 2nd, 2013 by Stacy Shelley

rest1
As Asheville has emerged as a premier food destination, it’s become more difficult for new venues to find the space to cut out of the market. This makes opening a restaurant even more risky than normal. The competition is fierce out there.

Into the ring comes a brash new contender, Seven Sows, a collaborative effort between chef Adam Bannasch of Zambra, chef Mike Moore of Blind Pig Supper club and Jason Caughman of Pisgah Brewery. Seven Sows celebrates southern cooking and serves dinner and weekend brunches that feature local and heirloom products and a bar that focuses on bourbon.

We ventured out with friends to investigate this new eatery during its opening week. There were several birthdays around the table and I have to say that some members of the party were giddy with anticipation.

Through the doors, we found the décor rustic, nothing fancy – but definitely down home and welcoming. Authentic barn siding here. Tin roof there. A wall painting of a lady holding a ham. Nothing pretentious – you are here to eat, or drink, or both. No hoity-toity here – just good food and drink.

rest3And the menu – what fun! But, I get ahead of myself. Drinks first. It would be safe to say one of the better selections of Bourbon and Rye in the area. Actually, the selection of Whiskey, Irish Whiskey, Scotch, Brandy, Rum, Gin, Vodka, Tequila and Apertif’s are all top of the line. My husband chose the “Larceny” – for its name and he was rewarded by the butterscotch aroma and smooth, smoky flavor that warmed its path. Half of the party selected a bourbon of personal fancy (no easy choice given the list) and the other half chose grapes (of the fermented variety). Both halves were pleased with the selection and their decisions. Being a Bourbon enthusiast my husband could not resist following up the “Larceny” with a signature cocktail, a Buffala Negra (W. L. Weller 12 Yr Bourbon, Fresh Basil, Aged Balsamic, Fever Tree Ginger Ale, Simple Syrup concoction) that shoots up the charts as one of Asheville’s top elixirs.

For appetizers and to get into the theme, we sampled: Shaved Country Ham Board with selections of Benton’s Tennessee Month and Mangalitsa and Colonel Newsom’s Aged Kentucky ham. Pickled vegetable, grilled bread mustards, Texas Pete Mayo, and Sweetgrass Dairy Appalachian Cheese.

And Cone O’ Chicken Cracklins and the Buttermilk Hushpuppy Basket (with hot pimento cheese). We turned our gazes on to the entrees. Not one of our self-described “foodies” was adventurous enough to try the Pig Head Meatloaf with apple chutney, pickled mustard seeds, Southern Appalachia Sorghum, crispy pig ear and grilled bread, but maybe next time and after a few more bourbons.

We did have and enjoy the Mountain Goat with Brunswick Stew (and cornbread). No self-respecting southern kitchen could hang its sign if there were no fried chicken wasn’t coming out of it. No offense Gramma, butrest4 this buttermilk fried chicken with crawfish mac and cheese and giblet and egg gravy — oh my.

And more items you would not expect on a “new Asheville” menu. The Laughing Seed (a very popular vegetarian restaurant here in Asheville) is not laughing at this lineup of southern fare. Beeler’s Farm grilled Duroc Pork Chop, Quail, Foothills Braised Pork Shank and Dry Aged Cab Ribeye to name a few.

Given the birthday celebrations, we ordered one of each of the desserts, sampled and passed them around theres2 table — partaking in Crème Brulèe, Blueberry Buckle, Butterscotch pudding and a sweet Fudge sauce, marshmallow, Cheerwine Syrup treatment that elevated the traditional Train City’s Moon Pie. I was surprised not to see any banana pudding, but not a complaint was heard and none of these particular decadent treats made it around the table twice.

Side Historical Note: The south’s favorite snack food, the Moon Pie originated in 1917. During the 1930’s, the Moon Pie found its place in Southern folklore as part of the “working man’s lunch.” Coal miners and laborers would enjoy the biggest snack on the rack, a Moon Pie and a 10 ounce RC Cola each for a nickel.

This is fine southern cooking treated with creativity and respect. I don’t remember Mama serving up any such fixins.’ A great place to visit before you head out on your dirt track date or go to see a show.

Here at Pinecrest Bed and Breakfast we’d be happy to secure you a dinner reservation during your visit to this Asheville Inn. Please call our toll free 888-811-3053 or visit our website at www.pinecrestbb.com

Winter Holiday in Asheville

January 10th, 2013 by Stacy Shelley

Happy New Year ! This year marks our 10 year anniversary as owners of this Asheville Bed and Breakfast. It’s hard to believe how fast time has flown by and here we are starting the New Year off much like last. The weather has been very mild, no snow and quiet. Even though January and February are usually slow months, it’s a great time to visit. The Biltmore Estate is still magnificent and less crowded. You can purchase your 2 day ticket for $35.00 from this Asheville Inn. Guests receive a complimentary audio guide with purchase. Children 16 and younger enjoy free admission.

Asheville’s restaurants are calmer – making reservations unnecessary on most nights and giving you some extra flexibility in your schedule. With temperatures expected to continue to be mild this year, outdoor hiking and activities are abundant. Strolling the streets of Asheville is a more leisurely and relaxed experience.

Here at Pinecrest Bed and Breakfast, our rates are reduced through March 31st. We also allow for one night bookings on the weekend, except certain holidays. This year we are offering an additional 5% savings if you book 2 weekend nights (Fri, Sat, Sun) through March 31st in the Grace, Thomas Wolfe or Wible suites.

Valentine’s day falls on a Thursday this year and we expect that the weekend following Valentine’s day to be busy, so you may want to start your planning your get-away now. We would really enjoy the opportunity to host you during your visit to Asheville. Please call our toll free 888-811-3053 for additional information or book online.

Exploring the River Arts District, Asheville NC

October 1st, 2012 by Stacy Shelley

This past weekend we explored the up and coming River Arts District. It’s been a while since we ventured down there in the evening and “wow” has it grown. There are several new galleries, restaurants and even an electric bike shop. We met up with our good friends who happen to also own a Montford bed and breakfast just a few doors down from us on Cumberland Avenue. It’s always nice to have an innkeeper friend you can call on at five till 9 in the morning when you realize you are missing one of the key ingredients for your breakfast, like butter or eggs and even 2 slices of bacon. Thanks James and Susan. They have been great friends and a source of support in many ways.

We began our evening at The Magnetic Field – a bar, restaurant and theatre venue. This is a great place to catch dinner and a show. The plan included dinner and the first performance of the evening (at 7:30). On this particular evening, they were featuring “MILF the Musical” and later in the evening “No she didn’t…Good Girls Gone Bad and the Dances that Happen” — probably not a show that has been cleared for family entertainment.

I am usually a wine drinker and rarely venture down cocktail road, but our friends were very excited about a favorite drink that was fortuitously featured on this special evening out and so we all went along for the ride. Our friends first experienced this delicacy while visiting Peru and have rarely seen it on a menu in the homeland. So if you go…even if it’s not on the menu, see if you can order a Pisco Sour Cocktail. You won’t make any friends with the bartender – it is a high maintenance drink –but this concern will melt away after just one and you can restore the relationship with a decent tip. This cocktail was invented in Peru around 1900 and uses Pisco, a Peruvian grape brandy and “it’s to die for!” The brandy itself is a bit stark, but when skillfully mixed with the other ingredients (sugar, egg white, lime juice), it becomes a smooth, frothy refreshment pleasure. Avoiding the risk of damaging a long-established relationship with your favorite bartender, I am going to include the recipe at the bottom of the blog so you can try this at home.

The dinner menu is small but focused on quality and features local and seasonal ingredients. I had local trout that was on a bed of butter beans and sea island peas over a lovely cauliflower puree and surrounded by a brown butter sauce. The portion was the perfect size and just scrumptious. My husband enjoyed the flat iron steak with roasted fingerling potatoes, local shitake mushrooms, sautéed greens and a Cabernet demi-glaze. The meat was very tender and the sauce a perfect accompaniment to the plate. Our friends enjoyed a plate of local cheeses, crab bisque soup (which had a nice little kick) and peel and eat shrimp which were a good size and fresh and tender. The service was also “spot on”.

As can be the case with dinner theater, the dinner component can be quite lacking. This is not the case at The Magnetic Field. This restaurant can stand on its own merit. Everyone had a great meal and great fun at the “theater” portion of the evening.

Next on our list is the Junction (which is located just up the block from Magnetic Field) and is also focused on local and seasonal ingredients. It is rumored they just may have the best burger in town…as self-proclaimed experts on the topic; we’ll be the judge and let you know. For more recommendations on great dinner spots don’t forget to ask your innkeepers at this Asheville bed and breakfast.

Pisco Sour
• 1/4 cup (2 oz.) pisco (grape brandy)
• 1 tablespoon sugar
• 1 tablespoon fresh lime juice
• 1 teaspoon pasteurized egg whites
In a blender, whirl 3 ice cubes, Pisco, sugar, fresh lime juice, and egg whites. Whirl until smooth (you’ll no longer hear the ice cracking against the side of the blender) and serve straight up in a martini glass with a dash of aromatic bitters and a wedge of lime.

For more information or to book a room visit www.pinecrestbb.com or call 888-811-3053. We look forward to hosting you at our Asheville Bed & Breakfast very soon.

Trolley Tours are a Great Way to Experience Asheville

August 8th, 2012 by Stacy Shelley

Taking you on an adventure this time around, we have a guest blog from my parents (Pinecrest Bed and Breakfast resident innkeepers), who ventured out with some friends of theirs visiting from Indiana.   There isn’t a better way for them to get a good feel for our fair city than to hop aboard a historic trolley tour.

And so, off they went to the Asheville Visitor Center to board the Gray Line Trolley. The Visitors center is 5 blocks from this Asheville Inn. The trolley tours are fully narrated by a professional tour guide, who is well versed in historic tid bits about the city of Asheville. One great thing about taking the trolley is that you get to let someone else hold the wheel – letting the driver worry about traffic and parking and allowing you to enjoy the sights without causing any traffic mishaps.  Plus, the ticket is good for 2 consecutive days and you are allowed to hop off the trolley at any one of the stops and get back on when you feel like it. Every 30 minutes the trolley glides by each stop. The cost is 21.00 per adult and 10.00 for children ages 5 – 11.  They also offer AAA and AARP discounts of 2.00 per ticket. For your convenience we sell the tickets from our Asheville  bed and breakfast .

After departing the Visitor Center, the trolley made its way through the Montford Historic District, which just so happens to be where our Asheville Bed and Breakfast is located.  This District Montford retains more than 600 buildings, most of which were built between 1890 and 1920, and includes a variety of architectural influences reflecting the cosmopolitan character of Asheville during the turn of the 20th century.

Famous Asheville architect (and supervising architect of the Biltmore House) Richard Sharp Smith designed many of the residential homes in Montford. Smith’s architectural leanings contribute to the character of this area.

Montford has always been primarily residential, but also has a history of including several board houses and sanitariums (for the treatment of tuberculosis and other ailments) included in the neighborhood mix.  In recent years, Montford has developed into a bed and breakfast community with numerous inns included in the mix.

Also within the Montford Historic District is Asheville’s Riverside Cemetery,  It is the cemetery where you will find the final resting place for Thomas Wolfe and William Sydney Porter (better known as O. Henry) as well as Confederate General Robert B. Vance and North Carolina Governor Zebulon Vance, among other Asheville luminaries.

The large houses that line the streets of this neighborhood reflect a more prosperous time in Asheville.  Montford and Pinecrest Bed and Breakfast is listed in the National Register of Historic Places.  The district is located an easy walk or bike ride from downtown Asheville.

Unfortunately, it misses passing our inn — also a “Robert Sharp Smith” — by a block. Their trolley cruised by an old home which years ago was a sanitarium. It is where Zelda Fitzgerald, the beautiful debutante flapper from Alabama who inspired F. Scott Fitzgerald’s Jazz Age stories was a patient and where she died in March of 1948.

After leaving Montford, the trolley meandered through the Grove Park neighborhood until it reached the Grove Park Inn. It is here that George Vanderbilt stayed during his first trip to Asheville. My parents and their friends decided to jump off the trolley and check out the Grove Park Inn, more specifically the spectacular view of the mountains from the terrace. The trolley guide informed them it was this terrace where George Vanderbilt looked out and decided he would buy all the land he could see.

Next stop: the Thomas Wolfe House.  Your trolley ticket allows you free admission to the historic home where the writer, Thomas Wolfe lived as a boy. Mr. Wolfe is also buried at the Riverside Cemetery.  Hopping back on board, the trolley headed toward downtown and into Pack Square.  Following the depression, many art deco buildings were constructed and through the years the city has tried to retain the architectural heritage by maintaining and restoring these beautiful structures.  After driving through the square the trolley made its way over to the Haywood Hotel. Everyone was ready to stretch their legs so they hopped off and wandered around downtown for a while. They strolled through the Woolworth building which houses 2 floors of artist galleries and an old fashion soda fountain. They then crossed the street and indulged in some sinfully delicious chocolate at the Chocolate Fetish, a local Chocolatier,some might say “chocolate artists.”

Rejoining their fellow tourists, and a few locals enjoying the tour, the trolley made its way down toward the French Broad River.  The River Arts District is currently experiencing a major resurgence and is quite the happening place these days. Several breweries are moving in and more restaurants are surfacing in this lively center of art, artists, galleries and studios.

The trolley then headed south to Biltmore Village. Biltmore Village was built by George Vanderbilt in the late 1890′s as a classic planned community at the entrance to the Biltmore Estate. Today the Village is a cottage community of shops, restaurants and art galleries. At this point everyone was getting hungry so they departed the trolley and walked around the Village, which has tree-lined streets and brick sidewalks. They ended up at Chelsea’s Tea Room for afternoon tea and finger sandwiches. They sat outside in the lovely courtyard and despite the warm temperatures they really enjoyed themselves…even the men. As they strolled back to the trolley stop they passed some of the original buildings, such as All Souls Church (now All Souls Cathedral) the church built for the Vanderbilt’s, the old train depot which is now a restaurant, and some of the original estate cottages.

Although you can take the entire tour in about an hour and a half, this little adventure took all of 5 hours.  Crazy kids!

For more information or to book a room visit www.pinecrestbb.com or call 888-811-3053.

A Day Spent Being a “Tourist” in Asheville

June 29th, 2012 by Stacy Shelley

It looks like I am going to be forced into taking more time off work to do more hiking and sightseeing (a.k.a. “guest research”). The response to my last blog on our trip up to Max Patch was over the top. Honestly, I really didn’t appreciate how many people actually read our blogs. Many of our guests have been inquiring about Max Patch and venturing up there for a hike and to take in the beautiful views. Several have even made their way over to Hot Springs for a relaxing soak. One guest suggested that I emphasize the road is narrow, gravel and winding, but well worth traveling to see the views.

Unfortunately, I am at the inn 7 days a week and do not have many opportunities to go on such adventures. However, this last weekend my husband and I found ourselves kidless, which rarely happens in our active house of three of the little time traps.  On Saturday, my husband had to pick up a rental car for a work trip to his surprise they suited him up in a neon-lime sherbert colored convertible mustang. It screamed “rental” or at least we hope it did as we made our way through downtown Asheville on a sunny Saturday afternoon. We decided to meander through town with no plans except to hit the Fine Arts Movie Theatre at 7 for a movie. I know most people do not come to Asheville to see a movie, but we have a great small theatre downtown, which features mostly smaller independent films. It has two screens, serves adult beverages and doesn’t show blockbusters or Disney films so kids are a rarity. It is a very adult experience and you really can’t go wrong with whatever is playing here.

Gourmet Potato Chip Company

We started our adventure at the south location of 12 Bones restaurant after dropping our youngest off at his friends on that side of town.  12 Bones is well known for great barbeque and may be more famous as President Obama’s first stop when he arrives in Asheville.  I dined on the Wedge salad – yes, 12 bones does have lighter fare and my husband made a mess of their award winning Blueberry Chipotle ribs.  We sat outside and sipped ice tea and reveled in how it felt to be sans kids.  We decided to do a little shopping at the outdoor adventure stores, Diamond Brand and REI before heading back into town. We visited the newest bicycle shop Beer City Bicycles on Biltmore Ave. Asheville has a slew of bike stores but this one serves local brew and chips and salsa. My husband has been mounting a steadfast campaign to convince me he needs a new road bike. I guess he thought if I had a beer while we shopped that I might warm up to the idea. Even in Asheville there is probably not enough beer — especially since road bikes can cost as much as a new car for me to give in.  After leaving there without a bike, we parked downtown and started walking. Asheville’s sidewalks are always bustling with people and it always fun to take in the sights and unique shops.  We stopped in the Gourmet Potato Chip Company…seriously they hand make and then sell just potato chips, seasoned in many creative and delectable ways.  Only in Asheville.

We checked out some of the local street performers and heard some music at Pritchard Park.  Eventually making our way over to the Grove Arcade to check out the local craft artists selling there merchandise outside.  We had developed a thirst from our walk so we secured an outdoor table at Carmel’s, wolfed down a pizza and slaked our thirst with blueberry lemonade.   This is one of the better spots for people watching in Asheville.

We needed to get home to shower and then head back out in time to see our movie. This seems to be the way our guests go about their visit – returning the Bed & Breakfast in the late afternoon after their day’s activities before heading back out for dinner. We skipped dinner, but did hit Limones (conveniently located just around the corner from the Fine Arts Theater) for a quick margarita. Limones has the best margaritas in Asheville. They also happen to have great food and great people working there. We did make it to the movie, but got talked into seeing Bernie instead of The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel.  It was funny and Jack Black did a wonderful job.

After the movie, we walked over to the restaurant Storm Rhum Bar and again sat outside and enjoyed a late dinner and some crazy rum drinks. The food was fabulous, the atmosphere intoxicating and the company delightful. What a day. I just wish I could visit here all the time. But alas, we have to retrieve the kids and get back to work.  I guess we can live vicariously through the guests that visit our Asheville Bed and Breakfast.  We will keep up the research.

For more information about Pinecrest Bed and Breakfast Inn, visit www.pinecrestbb.com or call 888-811-3053.

Asheville, NC is a Vegetarian, Gluten Free and Vegan Diner’s Dream

February 28th, 2012 by Stacy Shelley

Asheville, North Carolina continues to live up to it’s title of Best Vegetarian-Friendly Small City.  Asheville is a vegetarian, gluten free and vegan diner’s dream. Starting in downtown Asheville and heading north along a 2 mile stretch of road, locals affectionately refer to as the Merrimon Shuffle, you will find two exclusively vegetarian restaurants; the Laughing Seed and  Rosetta’s, Posana, a gluten free restaurant, Plant, a vegan restaurant and VegHeads, a vegetarian drive thru. Only in Asheville.  Along the way you will also go by Greenlife  Grocery store which features everything from “simple vegetarian to “raw” cuisine in a mostly local food approach. And this is just the Merrimon Shuffle. You will find many more  food co-ops, grocers and other restaurants that fulfill the needs of any dining desires.

Asheville has built itself into quite the vegetarian-friendly city, and continues to add more animal-free  dining options.  The Laughing Seed, a perennial favorite  and well-known to visitors and locals alike calls itself a global fusion vegetarian restaurant and offers an eclectic vegetarian menu.  This Asheville tradition also serves organic, seasonal, farm-to-table, vegetarian cuisine with an international flair.

Global fusion is very much alive at the Laughing Seed.  Right now, you can experience the deep, slow cooked tastes of Thailand as well as the simple, but intensely satisfying flavors of the Mediterranean and Caribbean. Sunflower seed pesto and cashew nut ricotta form a deliciously satisfying filling for their raw Spinach Pesto Manicotti.  Their sushi offering changes nightly, along with their pasta special and authentic Indian thali plate.  And nothing says “comfort food” more that their classic Harmony Bowl, Tempeh Reuben, or Tico Burrito

The new kid on the block, Plant, another farm-to-table  concept brought to Asheville by the partnership of Jason Sellars (the former chef at The Laughing Seed) and Leslie Armstrong and and Alan Berger (former owners of the best independent video store in the city — Rosebud.  Plant has only been open a short time, but is already drawing a sophisticated crowd who appreciates the quality of the food, prepared from fresh local ingredients. The farm-to-table concept is strong in Asheville and continues to grow, benefiting our local farmers and the restaurant clientele.

Plant, also a completely vegan restaurant, describes itself as “A restaurant with roots; sophisticated scratch-made food from the earth.” Nothing is served that is an animal or a by-product of any animal. This can be quite unnerving to the uninitiated, but trust us — your taste buds will revel in the new experience.  Our favorites were the Mushroom Risotto, the smoked Portabello and the truffle fries (of course).  We do hear that the Reuben and the Peppercorn encrusted Seitan are out of this world.

As a locally-owned independent business, Plant is committed to a deep concern for the environment, our individual and collective health, and ethical and compassionate lifestyles.  Success for them means that their guests feel rewarded for choosing the compassionate and exciting dining experience that Plant offers.

If you are looking for an epicurean adventure that is sure not to disappoint — shuffle up to 165 Merrimon Avenue (a short trip from this Asheville Inn.

Here at Pinecrest Inn Bed and Breakfast we strive to accommodate our guests special dietary requests. We source local and support our area farms and grocers. We also promote the restaurants that use the same approach.  For more information visit us at www.pinecrestbb.com or contact our Asheville Bed & Breakfast for reservations 888-811-3053.


Nothing Like a Fresh Cut Christmas Tree – Let this Asheville Inn be your Guide

November 18th, 2011 by Stacy Shelley

Let this Asheville Inn be your guide to the best fresh cut Christmas trees in WNC! We are so fortunate to live in western North Carolina, the number two state in the country for growing Christmas Trees! There are 3 farms within 30 minutes of Asheville and many more as you drive toward Boone.  One of our family favorites is Sandy Hollar Farm located in the beautiful Sandy Mush area about 30 minutes north/west of Asheville.  Every year we head out to Sandy Mush, which  also happens to where our good friends and well known organic farmers, Vanessa and Alex Brown call home.  Our kids always enjoy the hayride up to the meadow passing llamas and goats,  where we pick  and cut down two Frasier Firs — one for our Asheville Bed and Breakfast and one for our private home.  Each of the farms listed below offer hay rides and other holiday festivities. Rounding out the family outing, Santa often shows up so the kids can sit on his lap and tell them what they would like for Christmas. To start your holiday season visit us at Pinecrest Bed and Breakfast in Asheville, NC and take advantage of all the holiday festivities. Visit us at www.pinecrestbb.com.

You can certainly get into the holiday spirit with so much to see and do.  Most folks will want to visit the Biltmore Estate, which is all lit up for the holidays.  If you’ve been good, you will want to walk around downtown or in Biltmore Village to knock some items off of your own Christmas list.  Adding a trip to the country to cut your own tree might just become a family tradition of your own.

Sandy Hollar Tree Farm
63 Sandy Hollar Road
Leicester, NC 28748
828.683.3645
Choose & Cut Christmas Trees, Christmas Tree Live, Christmas Trees, Hay Rides, Tours, Wreaths. Sunday-Saturday 9 am-4:30 pm; Open seven days from the weekend before Thanksgiving through the weekend before Christmas. Buy wreaths, garland (roping), decorations, refreshments, and crafts. Hay rides to the tree fields and marshmallow roasting on weekends.
Directions from Asheville: About 20 miles from downtown, follow Patton Ave/ U.S. Highway 19-23 South. Take NC 63 (Leicester Highway) 11 miles to North Turkey Creek Road (left). Go 1 1/2 miles to split, veer right onto Early’s Mountain Road. Go six miles. Farm is second drive on left past Robinson Cove Road (Sandy Hollow Lane).

Mehaffey Tree Farm

24 Corner Drive
Waynesville, NC 28785
828.926.1424
Open daily, except Mondays 9am-5pm from mid November to Christmas Week.
Enjoy a trip back to your own childhood by selecting your own Christmas tree from among acres of beautiful Fraser firs. Sometimes Mother Nature provides a light dusting of snow to make your visit even more magical. Their specialty is high-quality Fraser Fir trees. They cut your favorite tree, bale it and tie it on your vehicle. Located in the heart of the Great Smoky Mountains near Maggie Valley & Waynesville. They offer paved access, plenty of parking, restrooms, and even free refreshments in a heated section of their Morton building. They have five to12 foot trees, plus wreaths, roping and tree stands.
Directions from Asheville (30-40 minute drive): Follow I-40 west to exit 20. Travel 3.1 miles on Hwy. 276 South, Turn right onto Grindstone Rd. Travel 1.3 miles on Grindstone Rd. to Hemphill Road, Turn right on Hemphill Rd. and travel .1 miles to 24 Corner Drive.

Frosty Mountain Christmas Trees
13623 Highway 212
Marshall, NC 28753
Phone: 828.656.8100
This “no-frills” tree farm is a short distance off I-26 near the North Carolina/Tennessee line. They produce Fraser fir Christmas trees for choose-and-cut. Visitors will find the farm by the large American flag painted on the barn. You’ll be surrounded by hillsides of trees and fields with cows, goats, and a llama or two. Donna and Chipper Jones and their children grow 80,000 Fraser fir on 55 acres of their 300 acre farm at elevations of 3200 to 4800 feet. Open early November through December 20, dawn to dusk.
Directions from Asheville: Take I-26 West toward Weaverville, Take Exit #50, Flag Pond Rd., Turn left at Higgins Creed Rd., Go 1/4 mile and turn right at T-intersection onto old Hwy 23., Go almost 2 miles and turn left at TN-352., Go 4.5 miles to NC line and the road becomes Hwy 212. The farm is 1/2 mile.

Asheville’s premier food event, the Taste of Asheville, will be held on November 17, 2011 at The Venue at 21 North Market Street from 7:00pm – 9:00pm. This highly anticipated annual fundraising event, held by the members of Asheville Independent Restaurants (AIR), will feature food from 37 restaurants as well as wine tasting and beer tasting from local breweries. “ We are very excited about this year’s event as it has a record number of participating restaurants and will feature some of Asheville’s top chefs,” says Steve Frabatore, AIR’s president. “These same restaurants are participating in our 2012 AIR Passport, which will be kicked off that same evening ”. The AIR Passport program offers discounts at many of Asheville’s top restaurants while encouraging passport holders to try new restaurants.

For reservations at our Asheville Inn, visit www.pinecrestbb.com or call 888-811-3053.

It’s Not Too Late to Book a Room November 17 and Sample “Taste of Asheville”

November 16th, 2011 by Stacy Shelley

Taste of Asheville, Asheville’s premier food event, will be held on November 17, 2011 at The Venue at 21 North Market Street from 7:00pm – 9:00pm. This highly anticipated annual fundraising event, held by the members of Asheville Independent Restaurants (AIR), will feature food from 37 restaurants as well as wine tasting and beer tasting from local breweries. “ We are very excited about this year’s event as it has a record number of participating restaurants and will feature some of Asheville’s top chefs,” says Steve Frabatore, AIR’s president. “These same restaurants are participating in our 2012 AIR Passport, which will be kicked off that same evening ”. The AIR Passport program offers discounts at many of Asheville’s top restaurants while encouraging passport holders to try new restaurants.

A portion of the proceeds from the evening and the sale of the Passports will go to benefit AIR’s “Chefs of Tomorrow” scholarship at AB Tech. Tickets for the event are $70 for a single ticket and $125 for a pair. Tickets will go on sale October 3rd on the AIR Website www.airasheville.org.  Call today and book your room at the Asheville Bed and Breakfast 888-811-3053 or visit our website and book online www.pinecrestbb.com.

 

 

Oktoberfest Downtown Asheville October 8, 2011

October 2nd, 2011 by Stacy Shelley

Photo Courtesy of www.exploreasheville.com

Autumn is here and time to get out your lederhosen and polka down to Wall Street, a quaint cobblestone street with an old world feel for Oktoberfest Asheville.  Join all the folk on October 8 for some good food and delicious beer.  The festival is a mix of Bavarian traditions with Asheville’s own twist mixed in.   Asheville was recently recognized as “Beer City USA” making this event a perfect opportunity to sample biers from our local award winning breweries.

The event will feature tastings from Highland Brewing, Asheville Brewing Company, Pisgah Brewing, Green Man Brewery, and French Broad Brewing Company. Many brewers are featuring seasonal ales for Oktoberfest, and will be on hand to discuss their beers. Also, Wall Street restaurants will be preparing authentic German fare including bratwurst, schnitzels and traditional sides.

The Stratton Mountain boys will be on hand providing lively Polka music which means lots of dancing will be going on. Advance purchase tickets are $25.00 per person, and $35.00 the day of event. Tickets will be available September 1 at ashevilledowntown.org. And the best news of all… you can walk from this Asheville Bed and Breakfast.

For more information about the Pinecrest Inn Bed & Breakfast in Asheville or visit www.pinecrestbb.com.

 

Stay at this Asheville Bed and Breakfast & Check out the Latest Additions to the Local Food Scene

August 30th, 2011 by Lisa Lidback

Cúrate

At the Pinecrest Bed and Breakfast, we take our restaurant recommendations seriously. For such a small hamlet, Asheville has a remarkable array of dining experiences to offer. A lot of behind-the-scenes work goes in to ensuring our guests have a wonderful visit to our fair city. Recently, our research took us to two of the newest arrivals to the local restaurant scene — Cúrate and Storm. Both are located downtown, but are on the southern edge, stretching the definition of a “leisurely stroll” from this Asheville Bed and Breakfast. Unless your aim is to walk off dinner, you may want to consider another mode of transportation.

Cúrate is a traditional Spanish tapas bar. The atmosphere was casual and bustling with patrons. We enjoyed an array of small plate specialties from the traditional tortilla espanola (spanish potato and onion omelet) to the more creative plates like pimientos de piquillo con queso de cabra (peppers stuffed with goat cheese), espinacas a la cantalana (sauteed spinach with raisins, apples and pine nuts) and the bocadillo catalan (special-made Spanish sausage with piquillo pepper confit )and our table favorite.

Felix, one of the co-owners, takes great pride in his wine selection and we would have to say he is on the right track. After sampling several throughout the evening, we settled on a beguiling 2009 Finca Resalso – Tempranillo as our favorite — scurrying around the following day to see if our friends at the Wine Studio could procure this velvety elixir. Alas, to no avail.

You can tell that service is emphasized here. Despite a very busy night, our server took excellent care of us and guided us through the rather extensive menu selections.

Storm, which bills itself as a Rhum bar and bistro, is just around the corner from the Orange Peel (and is open late nite to satisfy your post concert hunger). In keeping with the Rhum bar theme, we quenched our hot summer thirst with a rum and ginger beer cocktail (one of many creative cocktails that they offer).

Another tantalizing menu is offered up here — we started with a cheese board that rivaled any we have had elsewhere. Moving on to some of the selections, we tried the grilled hangar steak, the East Fork Farm Lamb and the Scallops. All three dishes were wonderfully prepared. And as an added bonus Storm also offers a small plate/large plate option. With an eclectic and welcoming interior (and a great outdoor space for cooler eves), Storm is another excellent addition to the fabulous Asheville lineup of dining treasures.

And so now, we have two more stellar restaurant offerings for our guests to enjoy.

In our effort to deliver the greatest Asheville experience, we will continue keep up the research and let you know what we find. It’s hard work, but we do so with our guests in mind. For more on Pinecrest Bed & Breakfast in Asheville, visit us at www.pinecrestbb.com.

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