The Pinecrest Bed and Breakfast Asheville NC

Posts Tagged ‘Asheville Bed & Breakfast’

Planning a Fall Visit to our Asheville Inn

September 9th, 2014 by Stacy Shelley

fall applesIt’s that time of year again when throngs of visitors travel to the mountains of Asheville to see the area’s breathtaking fall foliage. As the evenings start to cool off we are seeing the leaves start to change around the Inn. The question we get a lot this time of year is “When is the peak color weekend?”  Hard to say, as it varies each year, but peak colors in lower elevations are typically between the third week in October and the first week in November. To play it safe, a scenic drive on the Blue Ridge Parkway is always a great way to find the best color almost anytime.

For visitors coming in late September or early October, head north and check out some of the higher elevations like Mount Mitchell  and Grandfather Mountain areas. Late season visitors coming at the end of October or early November typically catch more color at more southern destinations like Mt. Pisgah, Lake Lure and Chimney Rock, where views are premium.

In addition to hiking our beautiful mountains amidst a flurry of fall color, there are lots of cultural and tasty events you won’t want to miss out on. Here’s a little sampling of the many fun things to do in and around Asheville this fall.

On September 27th the North Carolina Arboretum celebrates Southern Appalachian traditions with Carolina Craft Day from 11 AM until 4 PM. Enjoy the displays by local artists and crafters whose work reflects the heritage of Western North Carolina.

Feeling the need to infuse a little German tradition into your fall festivities?  Then don’t miss Oktoberfest on October 11th, in downtown Asheville on Coxe Avenue. It’s a great way to celebrate our local beer scene.  Event runs from 1-6 PM. Buying advance tickets is recommended since it typically sells out. And don’t forget folks, this is one of our few adult only festivals.

Headed south to leaf peep? Why not check out Chimney Rock every Friday and Saturday, each weekend from October 10-November 1st for “Beats, Burgers & Brews at the Old Rock.” Enjoy the sounds of bluegrass, Americana, blues and more while sipping a cold regional craft brew or glass of wine along the river.

The Orchard at Altapass is always a fun and beautiful stop along the Blue Ridge Parkway, at Milepost 328, roughly 50 miles north of Asheville between Mt. Mitchell and Linville Falls. This 100-year-old apple orchard turned cultural icon, celebrates the people, music, art, and natural beauty of the Blue Ridge Mountains. Pick apples, take a hay ride or just listen to some live folk music. Check their website for daily and weekend activities and schedules www.altapassorchard.org.

September through November are the busiest months at our Asheville Bed & Breakfast, so plan ahead and call early for reservations 828-281-4275. We are more than happy to assist you with planning the perfect visit or a cozy weekend stay at our historic Asheville Inn. We look forward to seeing you soon.

Botanical Gardens in Asheville Highlights over 600 Native Plant Species

June 25th, 2014 by Stacy Shelley

abgThe Botanical Gardens in Asheville is located in the Southern Appalachian  Mountains, one of the most diverse and temperate ecosystems in the world. The Gardens consist of a ten acre piece of property with over 600 species of plants native to the local region. Tucked among the many conifers, birch and magnolias are more than fifty rare plant species, various types of ferns and wildflowers. The park even gets an occasional visit from bobcats, coyote, bears and red shouldered hawks.

Once you enter the Gardens, you can follow the half-mile trail that crosses a bridge then loops around leading visitors by a stream, through meadows, and over a woodland ridge to a wildflower cove. An authentic “dog trot” cabin and a spring house demonstrate how our ancestors lived, and a lovely gazebo provides shelter in the midst of the Sunshine Meadow. Along the way, you’ll find benches and tables where you can stop with a picnic lunch or just take in a quiet rest. Just don’t forget to leave pets, radios, and sports equipment at home. Things that disturb the parks serene environment are frowned upon. Mid-summer months like July and August are a great time to see some of the mid-season blooming plants like Joe-pye Weed, Blazing-star, Green-headed Coneflower and Goldenrod.

The gardens offers a host of educational opportunities for adults and children, and a peaceful sojourn for others abg2who prefer to just wander the lovely grounds and take in the natural beauty. Sign up for a bird walk or a wild flower walk and take an early morning guided tour through the gardens. Just don’t forget your binoculars! The ABG is open year round from sunrise to sunset for the enjoyment of the community. No admission is charged for entrance, but donations are gladly accepted. The Visitor Center and most of the trails are wheelchair accessible.  For more information visit http://www.ashevillebotanicalgardens.org/.

Our historic Asheville Bed & Breakfast is a short walk or a couple minutes drive to the Botanical Gardens. We often suggest to our guests who enjoy an early morning run or walk that they head over to the gardens. It’s a lovely way to start your morning.  To book reservations at Pinecrest Inn, visit www.pinecrestbb.com or call 828-281-4275.

A Look at Asheville’s Vibrant River Arts District

February 21st, 2014 by Stacy Shelley

The Asheville River Arts  District, or RAD as it’s called, is the best place to dig up a big heaping slice of Asheville and shop for great art to boot. Visitors can watch local artists as they create one of a kind masterpieces right before your eyes. RAD has studios of almost every imaginable kind, most open 7 days a week, all year long. You name it; it’s all here from art galleries and pottery studios to doggie day care, hair salons, night life, bakeries, a theater, restaurants and more. Plus wellness workshops, painting and photography classes, lectures and almost else anything you can think of to stimulate the senses and help tap into your creative side.

Check out some of the classes available at Roots + Wings School of Art @ 342 Depot Street, The Asheville Darkroom @ 109 Roberts Street, The Village Potters @ 191 Lyman Suite #180, Asheville Glass Center @ 140 Robert Street, or the Cloth Fiber Workshop @ 122 Riverside Drive.

mag fields river arts district

The Magnetic Theatre

Not ready to commit to a class but want to partake in the fun? Then check out the 1st Fridays at the RAD or 2nd Saturdays starting March 7th. The River Arts District sponsors a series of art focused weekend events across the WNC region. Participating artists and businesses hold kiln openings, art retrospectives, art installation, museum openings, gallery receptions, music, theatre & dance performances, open studio days & more. Check out the calendar of events starting next month to find out what’s up and coming this spring.

RAD is also home to the legendary 12 Bones Smokehouse, the White Duck Taco shop, Wedge Brewing Company, Clingman Café, the Grey Eagle and many other fantastic places to dine and enjoy live music near the river. If you haven’t been to the River yet, put this little gem of a destination on your list of great places to visit in Asheville and get going!

For a complete list of studios, restaurants and things to do at the River Arts District, check out http://www.ashevillerad.com/visit/.  For accommodations at our award winning Asheville Bed and Breakfast just a short ten minute drive from the river, call 888-811-3053 or visit www.pinecrestbb.com for room availability. We hope to see you soon!

A Winter Visit to Biltmore

February 11th, 2014 by Stacy Shelley

While most of Asheville’s one million plus visitors come in the summer or fall, winter can also be a great time to visit with bm houseits unobstructed views and clear bright skies. If you’re lucky (weather depending), you might even catch the first sighting of some daffodils or tulips. The mild weather and free audio guides this month make February an especially great time to visit the Biltmore Estate. Winter also offers the lowest admission prices of the year, just $39 per ticket. Season pass holders can enjoy extra perks this month, like two free guest passes and extra discounts on estate shopping, dining, behind the scene tours and more.

From January 20th through March 19th, flower lovers can take advantage of a complimentary 45 minute Orchid Talk in the conservatory. The Biltmore features an amazing orchid collection if you’ve never seen them. Reservations are recommended and can be made the day of your visit at any Guest Services location. Don’t forget to tour the winery for complimentary tastings and unique gift ideas for those wine lovers back home.

Biltmore offers not only the largest home in America, but over 8,000 acres of lush grounds, hiking, kayaking, river rafting, biking trails, horseback riding, and much more! Discover all that Biltmore Estate has to offer on your next visit.

For tickets & information or other suggestions on where to visit while you’re staying at our award winning Asheville Bed & Breakfast, just check with your innkeepers Janna and Stacy. They are always ready to assist with anything you need. For Inn reservations visit www.pinecrestbb.com or call 888-811-3853.

 

Historical Places to Visit in and Around Asheville

January 17th, 2014 by Stacy Shelley

If you’re seeking some great historic sites to visit while in Asheville, check out some of the places on our list.

1.     Thomas Wolfe Memorial

The Thomas Wolfe home, built in 1883, now serves as the Thomas Wolfe Memorial. The rambling Victorian building he grew up in (his mother’s boarding house) was immortalized as “Dixieland” in his famous autobiographical novel Look Homeward, Angel. The novel has never gone out of print since its publication in 1929, keeping interest in Wolfe alive and attracting visitors to his historic home at 48 Spruce Street in Asheville.

2.      Carl Sandburg Home

Writer, poet and Pulitzer Prize winner Carl Sandburg died on June 22, 1967. After which his wife Lilian donated his home to the state of North Carolina to become a National Park. The park’s vast historical and cultural resources include 264 acres of pastures, ponds, small mountains and hiking trails, as well as a total of fifty structures, including the Sandburg’s residence and goat barn. Books, personal belongings, awards and photographs highlight the 22 years of his life Sandburg spent residing at Connemara in Flat Rock.

3.      St. Mary’s Church

St. Mary’s was constructed in 1914 in a cruciform plan in an English Gothic Revival style, incorporating the “correct” ecclesiastical style of Edwardian Anglo-Catholicism.  Prominent local architect Richard Sharp Smith designed the building and much of the interior furnishings. St. Mary’s is the only Anglo-Catholic church in North Carolina.

4.      Riverside Cemetery

cemetary

The Riverside Cemetery dates back to 1885 and encompasses 87 acres of rolling hills and flower gardens overlooking the French Broad River.  Riverside is the burial place of many of Asheville’s most notorious citizens including Thomas Wolfe, William Sidney Porter (better known as O. Henry), Zebulon B. Vance, Thomas Patton and confederate generals James Martin, Robert B. Vance and Thomas Clingman.

5.      Grove Arcade

Dr. Edwin Wiley Grove, a wealthy patent medicine manufacturer and real estate developer had the Grove Arcade built between 1926 and 1929, as a massive commercial mall with covered pedestrian thoroughfares and rooftop terraces. It was the most ambitious project conceived by Grove. During WWII the Arcade Building was occupied and modified by the Federal government and eventually housed the National Climatic Data Center until the 1990s. Today the Arcade’s Tudor Gothic Revival style is one of Asheville’s landmark architectural showplaces.

6.      Church of St. Lawrence

The Church of St. Lawrence was designed and built by Rafael Guastavino, an architect and builder who came to Asheville to work on the Biltmore House in the mid-1890s. After completing his work at Biltmore, he sought an alliance with friend and architect Richard Sharp Smith to design the Spanish Renaissance Revival Church of St. Lawrence in the early 1900’s. Construction was completed in 1909.  The entire Church is built of tile or other masonry materials. The center dome is reputed to be the largest freestanding elliptical dome in North America. The churches basilica interior features Spanish woodcarvings dating back to the mid-17th century.

Our Pinecrest Inn has its own historical roots dating back to Asheville’s boom in the early 1900’s.  The 1905 English Tudor style B&B, is listed on the National Registry of Historic Places. In 1913 Richard Sharp Smith, the lead architect for the Biltmore Estate was commissioned to design an addition to the house, making it even more significant. The name ‘Pinecrest’ was officially deeded to the house in 1928. Today the elegant home operates as an Asheville Bed & Breakfast located in the historic Montford district. For reservations or information visit www.pincrestbb.com or call 888-811-3053.

Our Visit to Asheville’s New Rhubarb Restaurant

December 29th, 2013 by Stacy Shelley

gn dinner

Goat Cheese Gnudi

In our never ending quest to discover new culinary finds in Asheville, we dined at one of the latest eclectic restaurants downtown, Rhubarb. We had read the reviews so we knew there’d be plenty of new flavors, and there was. After all, how often do you come across a lobster corn dog? A tasty twist on an old classic for sure, albeit a bit pricey for what amounted to gourmet carnival food. We also tried the crispy Brussels sprouts & cauliflower. We thought the portion was small, and the fried texture overwhelmed the delicate vegetables a bit, but it was a nice attempt to serve fall vegetables in a new fashion. Overall we shared two appetizers, a salad and an entrée and more than a couple glasses of wine. Our dinner selection proved to be the highlight of the evening, with the most interesting combination of flavors. We shared a salad with charred farro, turnips, crispy beets and grilled kale and an entrée with goat cheese gnudi (a light airy gnocchi like pasta made with yellow branch cheese) – lightly sauteed with roasted shallots, local mushrooms, wood grilled radicchio and toasted pumpkin seeds. The flavors were an unexpected delight. Overall the atmosphere was subdued and comfortable and the service was exceptional.

We had a great dinner, but with what ended up being a hefty price tag for an ordinary night out, we will probably save our next visit for a special occasion. That said, I would definitely recommend it to anyone searching for bold new flavors in a serene downtown setting.

Visit www.pinecrestbb.com/blog for more about our Asheville adventures. To inquire about Inn reservations at our Asheville Bed & Breakfast, call 888-811-3053. We hope to see you soon!

Things to Do this Winter in Asheville

December 11th, 2013 by Stacy Shelley

cataloochee ski

Cataloochee Ski Resort

shoji

Shoji Day Spa

Winter isn’t everyone’s favorite time, but for us it’s a time of quiet reflection, time to relax a bit and take in all the beauty around us. The mountains are spectacular this time of year and winter offers some of the best views when hiking (that is if you’re not intimidated by the colder temperatures.) There’s a certain exquisiteness about the trees in winter that you can’t truly appreciate unless you slow down on an early winter evening and watch the beauty unfold.  At sunset, the mountains thrust one last bit of sunlight tinged with pink and purple hues onto the sky’s canvas. The twilight sky seems to illuminate the now naked tree branches that sit in quiet repose. But beyond taking in the raw beauty of winter, there’s lots of other fun and relaxing things to do this winter in Asheville. Foodies still flock here to take in the vast culinary scene known as Foodtopia, then sit by a cozy fire at the end of a long day of site seeing and shopping. Here’s our recommendation of things to do this winter while you’re visiting.

  1. Hiking. Winter is simply put, the best time to take in the views. Just make sure you are packed properly. Here’s a trail guide that will help you choose the right hike http://www.blueridgeparkway.org/v.php?pg=61
  2. Antique Shopping. Slow down your pace and spend time browsing for antiques around town then take in lunch at a downtown café overlooking the square. Here’s a great list of Antique shops, put together by Romantic Asheville http://www.romanticasheville.com/antiques.htm
  3. Beer Tasting and Brews Cruises.  Asheville, or Beer City U.S.A. as it’s been named for the past four years, has dozens of brewery tours and beer tastings to choose from. A great way to spend a cool winter day indoors. Here’s a short list of places to do a beer tasting: Hops & Vines, Lexington Avenue Brewery, The Oyster House Brewing Company.
  4. Spa Day.  Ever visited an outdoor spa? Shoji Spa offers Japanese style outdoor hot tubs with mountain views, saunas and couples massage. For something more traditional, pick anyone of Asheville’s amazing spas and pamper yourself for the day.
  5. Gallery Hopping. Check out Asheville’s outstanding line up of art galleries. Here’s some of our favorites: Grove wood Gallery, Blue Spiral 1, Southern Highland Craft Guild, New Morning Gallery.
  6. Ski, tube or snowboard. Asheville is only about 30 minutes from Wolf Ridge Ski Resort, Cataloochee Skiing and Tube World.

Planning a visit to Asheville this winter? We still have some rooms available at our Asheville Bed & Breakfast. Celebrating an anniversary, birthday or special occasion? We’ll help you plan a special getaway with flowers, in room massage, a bottle of bubbly or anything else you may need for your special day. Pinecrest Inn is a beautiful, relaxing place to enjoy a winter getaway in Asheville. Call 888-811-3053 for reservations.

 

New Edison at Grove Park Inn Delivers Innovative Dining

November 15th, 2013 by Stacy Shelley

Edison-5-edited

Image by Carolina Epicurean

In late July of this year the Omni Grove Park revamped its in house restaurant and opened the new Edison Craft Ales + Kitchen. The restaurant’s new look is eclectic and lively, with much of the ceiling light provided by Edison-esque looking light bulbs – nodding to the Inn’s history; Thomas Edison was a regular summer guest there in the early nineteen hundreds.  One thing that hasn’t changed is the scenic views and amazing sunsets at this top-notch restaurant overlooking the city of Asheville. The restaurant has an enclosed section as well outdoors seating. The restaurant features large fireplaces and comfy couches and chairs to lounge inn as you sip wine or eat dinner.

Although the look and the name are new, the food and spirits featured on the menu continue to honor the local flavor and attitude of the region. The chic but casual restaurant carries ten North Carolina beers on tap, including several local ones. If you’re a beer lover, don’t miss the Centennial Pale Ale with a bit of hoppy spice and citrus undertones. The house beer is brewed exclusively for the Grove Park by Asheville’s own Highland Brewing Company.

If you haven’t been yet, you’ll quickly discover that the Edison’s menu is full of southern comfort food with a distinctively Ashevillian twist.  The oysters and cured meats are all fresh and fantastic with many items sourced locally. Everything we tasted was delicious without being overwhelmingly large or over the top. The deep fried egg with lamb and the prawns with red chili marmalade were both delicious! So the next time you venture out on the town to try something new in Asheville, put the Edison on your to-do-list. It’s well worth the trip.

The Edison is a short ten minute drive from our Asheville Bed & Breakfast. For more information or reservations at Pinecrest Inn, visit www.pinecrestbb.com or give us a call 888.811.3053. We look forward to seeing you soon.

 

WNC Farmer’s Markets Delight Visitors from Near and Far

July 19th, 2013 by Stacy Shelley

woman at marketAsheville is synonymous with many things…fresh air, great food, live music and farmers markets just to name a few. The mountains of WNC are home to over two dozen farmer’s markets, tail gate markets and organic farm markets.

No matter what day of the week or time of the year you visit Asheville, you won’t have a problem finding a market with plenty of hand made and locally grown foods to offer. A personal favorite of our Asheville Bed & Breakfast is the Montford Farmer’s Market open May through November from 2-6pm. This mid-week market is convenient to our Inn and close to downtown. This producer-only market provides a wide assortment of sustainably grown fruits and vegetables, flowers, baked goods, wood-fired breads, meats, local made cheeses and hand crafted wares from local artisans.

Don’t have a lot of time or want to catch a market in town? There are many smaller tailgate markets available with just about anything you can imagine from local grown foods and live music, to hand-made clothing from recycled materials. You can find one or more in just about every town. The French Broad Food Coop Tailgate Downtown Market, North Asheville Tailgate Market, Black Market Tailgate Market and West Asheville Tailgate Market are just a few of the many.

Another good option that’s always convenient is the state-owned WNC Farmer’s Market. Open year round, seven days a week the mostly indoor market offers quality fruits and vegetables, mountain crafts, jams, jellies, pickles, slow roasted peanuts, sourwood honey, fresh baked breads and dozens of other farm fresh items. The market is so large, it can easily become a half day trip for avid market goers. Inside is a deli that offers lunch and ice cream so you won’t leave hungry. There’s also an open-air market space where farmers, furniture makers, basket weavers and local vendors of all kinds can display their home-grown and hand-made wares. The market is open daily 8:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m., April-October; 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., November-March.

So many markets so little time! Don’t know which market to visit or when? The Appalachian Sustainable Agricultural Project publishes a Local Food Guide which lists all the farmers markets in the region.

Another great source for local market information is www.ncfarmfresh.com. The directory features a list of pick-your-own farms, roadside markets, and farmers markets throughout the state. Use it to help locate the freshest locally grown fruits, vegetables, christmas trees, ornamental plants, herbs and flowers. So the next time you visit our lovely Asheville Pinecrest Inn, plan a trip to one of our local farmer’s markets to experience all the farm fresh bounty and handcrafted arts of the region.

Planning a visit to Asheville soon? We hope to see you at our Asheville Inn, just a short walk from the Montford Farmer’s Market.  Visit www.pinecrestbb.com for reservations or call 888-811-3053.

Top 3 Friday Night Events in Asheville

May 14th, 2013 by Stacy Shelley

biltmore_estate_flowersThere’s nothing quite as beautiful and magical as a summer evening at the Biltmore Estate. Every Friday night this summer starting May 24th, Biltmore hosts its Fridays After Five event. Held at the Antler Hill Village and Winery, it’s the perfect way to kick off your summer weekend whether you’re a local or a visitor.

This family friendly event has something for everyone. You can bring your own picnic, or grab a hot dog, cotton candy or snow cone in the village. Parents and kids alike will groove to the beat of live music, while couples enjoying a romantic evening out can grab a quaint table for two at Cedric’s outdoor patio. Don’t forget to cool off at the notorious Biltmore Creamery with an old-fashioned milkshake, ice cream or float at the end of the evening. Access to Antler Hill Village & Winery is included in your Biltmore admission. Season pass-holders can bring friends to Antler Hill Village for free after 5:00 p.m. Catch the tunes of Viper’s Dream playing gypsy jazz on Friday, May 31st.

Talk about grooving to the beat! The Asheville Drum Circle is the place to be on Friday night if you want to see and hear all thedrum circle in asheville2 sights and sounds that Asheville has to offer. It’s a feast for the eyes and ears. Gather round as amateur and professional drummers from all walks of life beat their drums, tambourines, and every other instrument you can think of. The sound is truly one of a kind and never the same. You can find the drum circle in Pritchard Park downtown on Patton Avenue at College Street from around 6 PM until 10 PM. Experience this free, funky event every Friday night this summer. Impromptu drummers and dancers welcome, so bring your happy feet and your Ukulele and head on down.

If you happen to be staying at our Asheville Inn this summer on the third Friday of the month, you won’t want to miss Asheville’s biggest Friday night event, Downtown After Five. The free live music concert asheville concert and food event happens every third Friday, May through September. Join thousands of food and music loving locals gather on North Lexington Avenue where it intersects the I-240 overpass. The event runs from 5-9 PM and is celebrating its 25th year this year! Downtown After Five hosts some of the best local blues, rock n’ roll bands and solo artists. Thirsty concert-goers can sample a host of local brews from Highland Brewing Company, Pisgah Brewing, Asheville Brewing Company and others. And don’t worry, there’s plenty to eat for you foodies too. We recommend the taco truck if you get a hankering for a burrito with that ale. For a full line up of this summer’s entertainment, visit: www.ashevilledowntown.org.

Heading to Asheville for some summer fun? Enjoy a quiet retreat just 5 minutes from downtown at Asheville’s Pinecrest Inn Bed & Breakfast. Relax on over an acre of beautifully landscaped English gardens or take in the cool summer evening breezes on our sun porch. Call today for reservations or visit www.pincrestbb.com for more information.

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