The Pinecrest Bed and Breakfast Asheville NC

Archive for the ‘Leaf Season’ Category

October Asheville Arts and Crafts Events

October 5th, 2012 by Stacy Shelley

It’s that time of year again when people are flocking to Asheville to see the fall foliage. This has been a beautiful fall week. The leaves are starting to change and a cool breeze is in the air. Several arts and crafts events are coming up this month. Unfortunately, I am a little late on posting the Art Walk 2012 schedule for this weekend. This Art Walk is a self guided tour of Downtown Asheville. All the galleries and studios are within a half mile radius. This weekend also kicks off American Craft Week, a national initiative to highlight handmade art the folks creating it. Art in the Park continues through October 2oth and this Saturday in celebration of American Craft Week, will feature 60 area artisans and demonstrations by folk school crafters from John Campbell Folk School. The Craft fair of the Southern Highlands returns for their 65th year October 18-21. If you are into arts and crafts you are sure to get your fill in Asheville this month. For more up to date information on local events visit ExploreAheville.com.

October is a busy month so plan ahead and book now on line at www.pinecrestbb.com or give us a call at 888-811-3053. We are more than happy to assist you with planning the perfect visit or a cozy weekend stay at our historic Asheville Bed & Breakfast Inn.

Leaves by day and Moogfest by night.

October 4th, 2011 by Stacy Shelley

Robert Moog

Moogfest is the annual event that honors the remarkable vision of Robert Moog and his amazing musical inventions that changed the course of music.  Moogfest is a 3-day, multi-venue event held in Asheville, NC – the place Bob Moog called home for the last 30 years of his life.  The 2011 festival will be held the weekend of October 28 – 30.  Moogfest will host artists and audiences from throughout the world in different venues across Asheville’s beautiful, historic downtown.

Moogfest celebrates Bob Moog’s legacy as a sonic pioneer, which will be the thread that unites the festival’s rich array of musical offerings.  While the wide range of Moog instruments – the Minimoog Voyager, the Little Phatty, the Etherwave Theremin, Moogerfoogers, and the Moog Guitar – will play prominent roles throughout the festival’s events, the artists performing will certainly not be limited to those who create their work on Moog instruments.  Instead, artists will be chosen for their role in creating unique and groundbreaking musical experiences that embody the essence of Bob Moog’s visionary and creative spirit.

In addition to fantastic concerts by renowned performers of all kinds, Moogfest offers opportunities to engage with the artists in panel discussions, question and answer sessions, and workshops.  There will also be interactive experiences for the audience to explore their own musical creativity with a variety of Moog instruments.  The festival also offers visual art exhibitions, installations, and film screenings throughout the weekend.

Tickets are available online via Ticketmaster through the Moogfest web site, as well as through the Asheville Civic Center Box Office. The ACC box office is located at 87 Haywood Street, Asheville, NC 28801 and is open weekdays from 10:00AM – 5:00PM Eastern. You may purchase tickets via phone by calling (800) 745-3000.

Enjoy this festival from the comfort of our Bed and Breakfast in Asheville NC. Visit www.pinecrestbb.com to book reservations at our historic Asheville B & B or call 888-811-3053.

 

Oktoberfest Downtown Asheville October 8, 2011

October 2nd, 2011 by Stacy Shelley

Photo Courtesy of www.exploreasheville.com

Autumn is here and time to get out your lederhosen and polka down to Wall Street, a quaint cobblestone street with an old world feel for Oktoberfest Asheville.  Join all the folk on October 8 for some good food and delicious beer.  The festival is a mix of Bavarian traditions with Asheville’s own twist mixed in.   Asheville was recently recognized as “Beer City USA” making this event a perfect opportunity to sample biers from our local award winning breweries.

The event will feature tastings from Highland Brewing, Asheville Brewing Company, Pisgah Brewing, Green Man Brewery, and French Broad Brewing Company. Many brewers are featuring seasonal ales for Oktoberfest, and will be on hand to discuss their beers. Also, Wall Street restaurants will be preparing authentic German fare including bratwurst, schnitzels and traditional sides.

The Stratton Mountain boys will be on hand providing lively Polka music which means lots of dancing will be going on. Advance purchase tickets are $25.00 per person, and $35.00 the day of event. Tickets will be available September 1 at ashevilledowntown.org. And the best news of all… you can walk from this Asheville Bed and Breakfast.

For more information about the Pinecrest Inn Bed & Breakfast in Asheville or visit www.pinecrestbb.com.

 

Scenic Drives from this Asheville Bed and Breakfast

September 13th, 2010 by Stacy Shelley

Asheville’s proximity, snuggled into the Blue Ridge Mountains, provides guests to this Asheville Bed and Breakfast easy access via car and no shortage of opportunities to see the rolling landscape from the crest of the mountains that run primarily southwest – northeast.  North on the Blue Ridge Parkway: Craggy Gardens and Mount Mitchell. A short drive north from Asheville (24 miles from downtown) will take you up about 3,000 feet in elevation to Craggy Gardens and their Visitor Center (where you can pick up a trail map) with great views to the east and to the west. There is a large picnic area and a short hike to the top of Craggy Pinnacle. Continue north on the Parkway for nine miles and turn left onto N.C. 128 to Mount Mitchell State Park. This peak, the highest east of the Mississippi River, provides 360 degree sweeping views. In addition to expansive views, the Park offers an observation tower, hiking trails, picnic areas, a natural history museum and a restaurant.  You can return to Asheville via the same route.

South on the Blue Ridge Parkway: Mount Pisgah and Graveyard Fields. Drive south on the Parkway for a gradual climb with lots of tunnels and beautiful vistas. About 15 miles from Asheville is Mount Pisgah, a favorite hiking and picnic spot. The Pisgah Inn there offers good food and views from 5,000 feet in their restaurant that is open from April-October. Continue another 10 miles to Graveyard Fields (another popular hiking spot). Just before Graveyard Fields are great views of Looking Glass Rock. Return the same route back if you want a leisurely return or drop off the Parkway via Rt. 276 to Brevard (stopping for ice cream before taking Rt. 180 back toward I-26 and Asheville.

Cold Mountain Loop
This approximately 85-mile loop drive is a beautiful, hilly, curvy drive through a very rural area around Cold Mountain, made famous by the novel and major motion picture. From Asheville, travel south on the Blue Ridge Parkway. To view the famous peak, stop at Cold Mountain overlook at Milepost 411.9. (The views from the overlook are spotty with overgrown trees blocking most of the view. For the best view, go to the Wagon Gap Road Parking area at Milepost 412.2. Then walk back north on the Parkway a short distance.) At Milepost 423.2, take N.C. Highway 215 north for 13 miles. If you want to drive an extra 8 miles roundtrip to go to the base of the hiking trail, turn right onto Little East Fork Road. Views of the mountain here are very limited. Back at N.C. 215, continue for 5 miles. N.C. 215 will turn into Highway 110. Continue 5.3 miles. In Canton, turn right onto U.S. Highway 19/23 north. Turn left onto Church Street, and right on Newfound Road. Go 1.6 miles to I-40 East to return to Asheville.

Black Mountain Rag to Chimney Rock
Take exit 64 off Interstate 40 at Black Mountain to follow the Black Mountain Rag, a scenic route named for an old fiddle tune about the dark green Lauada Firs that give the Black Mountains their name. In musical terms, a “rag” is a tune with multiple twists and curves up and down the scales. This scenic route twists and turns through the mountains like the music itself. Coming from Asheville, turn right off the exit ramp at Black Mountain and follow N.C. 9 south towards Bat Cave. The road winds along the Rocky Broad River, joining Hickory Nut Creek near the intersection of U.S. 64, U.S. 74 and N.C. 9 at Bat Cave. Turn left and follow N.C. 9/ U.S. 64 east to the village of Chimney Rock. At Chimney Rock Park you can drive to the top of the Chimney overlooking Hickory Nut Gorge. Continue past Chimney Rock to see beautiful Lake Lure. Turn around at Lake Lure and head back. Instead of returning via N.C. 9 in Bat Cave, follow signs for U.S. 74 back to Asheville.

Our beautiful Pinecrest Bed and Breakfast in Asheville is close to everything you want to do and see this fall!  For details and reservations at our inn visit www.Pinecrestbb.com.

Fall is Coming Soon to this Asheville Bed and Breakfast

September 9th, 2010 by Stacy Shelley

Fall is just around the corner and with the burst of cool weather this gorgeous Labor day weekend leaves are already starting to show some color. As the cool Autumn breezes start to to be felt, the most oft-asked question at this Asheville Bed and Breakfast  is: “When is the peak color weekend?”  It seems like every year the color change gets later and later. Last year the leaves peaked (depending upon location) around Halloween weekend.  But, no matter when you plan an autumn visit to this Asheville Inn, you can always take a short drive on the Blue Ridge Parkway to find the best color. In early October you can head north on the Parkway to take in the highest elevations, Mount Mitchell, Craggy Gardens and Grandfather Mountain areas. By mid-October color should be in full swing heading south on the parkway,  Mount Pisgah, Black Balsam, Devil’s Courthouse, Waterrock Knob and Graveyard Fields,. It will also be peak color in the Highlands area, with plenty of waterfalls to enjoy, and the Great Smoky Mountains National Park.  Around the third and fourth weeks of October the city of Asheville will show it’s brightest colors. Head to Chimney Rock area (elevation of 1,300 feet) the end of the month and beginning of November and take a  ride to the top of Chimney Rock or take a boat tour on Lake Lure. As you can see, no matter when you visit this Asheville B & B you will be able to take in the beauty of Fall.  This schedule could, of course, change and will vary according to the temperature and rainfall we get between now and then.  We are beginning to see the first signs so you may want to go ahead and plan your trip.

Autumn in Asheville

July 24th, 2009 by Stacy Shelley

Leaf season is just around the corner and it is never too early to start planning your trip to the mountains to witness nature’s colorful spectacle.  The Asheville fall foliage of the North Carolina mountains attracts visitors from around the world. With the 5,000-foot elevation change within 50 miles of Asheville, our lush Blue Ridge Mountain range puts on one of the longest-running leaf color displays in the country. The trees start their show as the mountain air starts to cool, in Asheville this tends to happens in October although there are a number of supporting characters (precipitation, temperature, altitude) that determine this annual performance and so pinpointing “the peak” is always hit or miss, but you can always find color somewhere in the mountains.  The entire Blue Ridge Parkway is spectacular, nice 45mph drive, some really high places, cliff-dropping curves, lots of pull-offs, broken up by more normal sorts of traveling, all two lanes…one going one way and the other going the other way.

You can also keep an eye on the changes through the links below.  Plan early as rooms fill up well in advance.  Come for the leaves and enjoy everything else that Asheville and the surrounding mountains have to offer in the autumn.  No matter when you plan to visit the Asheville area, you can enjoy a variety of festivals and events featuring great music, art shows and much more in the city and towns of the Blue Ridge Mountains of North Carolina.

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